• ~IMPORTANT~

    $100 deposit and applications for our 2020 Kentucky Adventure Camp are due on Sunday, October 27th or Wednesday, October 30th.

Prayer Night—4/28/19

Last night was our monthly prayer night. These have turned out to be one of our most powerful events, and one that I personally look forward to each month!

We play worship music in the background while the group prays to God on behalf of AYM, their generation, and themselves. As students pray, they are able to write down what they feel God speak to them on the white board at the front of the room. It is truly incredible to see how clearly and powerfully the students hear from God during these times of prayer.

Each month, we continue to see students grow while beginning to operate in the gifts that God has given them.

You can check out some of the pictures from last night, including what students wrote on the whiteboard regarding what God was speaking to their hearts below:

Photos of a new game called “TEETH”:

Be Blessed and we’ll see you Sunday!

-Pastor Dustin

Who Is This Jesus? — 4/14/19

We had a powerful night last night in AYM!

Each week, you can sense God stirring the hearts of the students. Each week, you can sense that the students are being drawn closer into personal revival. Each week, we get closer and closer to seeing students walk in the fullness of their purpose and destiny!

Per the students request, we started pre-service prayer to pray for AYM, our schools, and generation.

Students praying before the AYM Service begins!

After Tribe Huddles, we played a few rounds of “Easter Minute to Win It”.

Round 1- NO YOKING AROUND (get the yolk out of four Caramel Cadbury eggs in sixty seconds using a plastic spoon).

The caramel yolks did not come out easily:)

Round 2- FLYING PEEPS (launch six peeps into a container ten feet away with a spoon in sixty seconds).

Jayvon getting ready to launch his PEEP!


Max getting ready to launch his PEEP!

Round 3- JELLY BEAN BILLIARDS (use the white jelly been as the cue ball to knock nine jelly beans off the table in sixty seconds).

Micah focusing on his shot!

The title of the message was “Who Is This Jesus?”.

We all may have different traditions and things that come to mind when we think about Easter, but there is one thing that connects us all, sinner and saint. Our Creator and Savior loved(s) us so much that he stepped into our humanity, took on flesh, went to the Cross as our perfect sacrifice, gave his life for us, rose from the grave, and is now seated at the right hand of the Father where he intercedes on our behalf.

Jesus died for you, me, the thief, the prostitute, the murderer, the rich, the poor, etc. The blood of Jesus is the detail that connects all of humanity. The question is, “Will you accept the gift of salvation and eternal life that Jesus shed his blood to provide?”.

Yesterday was Palm Sunday and the start of Holy Week. At the time of this event, it was Jesus Mania, and the popularity of Jesus was at an all-time high. He had just raised a man named Lazarus from the dead, and now he was making his way into the city of Jerusalem while fulfilling a 500 year old prophecy from Zechariah 9:9 and making his entrance as King into the city of Jerusalem.

Matthew 21:1-11 (CSB) says,

When they approached Jerusalem and came to Bethphage at the Mount of Olives, Jesus then sent two disciples, telling them, “Go into the village ahead of you. At once you will find a donkey tied there with her foal. Untie them and bring them to me. If anyone says anything to you, say that the Lord needs them, and he will send them at once.”

This took place so that what was spoken through the prophet might be fulfilled:

Tell Daughter Zion,
“See, your King is coming to you,
gentle, and mounted on a donkey,
and on a colt,
the foal of a donkey.”[a

The disciples went and did just as Jesus directed them. They brought the donkey and its foal; then they laid their clothes on them, and he sat on them. A very large crowd spread their clothes on the road; others were cutting branches from the trees and spreading them on the road. Then the crowds who went ahead of him and those who followed shouted:

Hosannato the Son of David!
Blessed is he who comes in the name
of the Lord!
Hosannain the highest heaven!

10 When he entered Jerusalem, the whole city was in an uproar, saying, “Who is this?” 11 The crowds were saying, “This is the prophet Jesus from Nazareth in Galilee.”

(Also read Luke 19:28-40 and John 12:12-19 for Luke and John’s account of the Jesus’s entry into Jerusalem)

The crowds spread their clothes and palm branches on the road as Jesus rides through. This was an act that people did to show submission to a king. As the crowds cried “Hosanna” (God saves; a cry of happiness; a cry for help; comes from root meaning to “save now”; to avenge, rescue, bring salvation, victory, deliver, save, help), they were acknowledging that Jesus had the power to save. They anticipated that Jesus would finally deliver them from the military and political rule of the Romans.

Jesus was indeed offering freedom, but it was a freedom far greater than political and military freedom. Jesus was offering spiritual freedom and victory over the Kingdom of Darkness. He wouldn’t achieve victory by overthrowing the Roman military and government. He would achieve victory through death on a Cross. This turned out to be too much for many to accept.

Unfortunately, the excitement didn’t last long as many of the same people who were shouting “Hosanna” were the same people just a few days later that were shouting “Crucify Him!”.

Parts of Matthew 21-23 show Jesus challenging the people and the religious leaders on how they were living and foretelling of the coming destruction of Jerusalem. He called out the hypocrisy and motives of part of the Pharisees which only intensified their efforts to kill him and spread lies about him among the people. The people wanted freedom from the Romans, but many wanted to live their lives for their own benefit on their own terms. The people wanted a savior to deliver them from the Romans, but Jesus came to be more than just our Savior.

Luke 2:11 (CSB) says, Today in the city of David a Savior has been born for you, who is the Messiah, the Lord.

Jesus came to be our Savior AND Lord. The Greek word for Savior is “soter” and means to save; a savior; a deliverer; preserver, one who saves from danger or destruction and brings into a state of prosperity and happiness. The Greek word for “Lord” is kyrios and means lord; master; a person exercising absolute ownership rights; master.

Jesus as Savior indicates your sins are forgiven. Jesus as Lord shows a shift in your life, including your sins being forgiven. Jesus as Lord indicates that you are no longer the king of your life, but Jesus is. Jesus as your savior says you are thankful he died for your sins. Jesus as Lord says you are thankful that Jesus died for you sins AND you are willing to surrender everything to him for his glory.

Who Is This Jesus? Are you currently living like Jesus is your Savior, or Lord and Savior? When a generation proclaims Jesus as Lord, mountains move and cities, states, and nations are shaken by the love and power of God Almighty.

What’s your answer to…

Who Is This Jesus?

If you have never accepted Jesus as your Lord and Savior, or have any other questions or prayer needs, we would love to talk and pray with you. You can email dours@newlife-church.org for prayer or questions.

Be Blessed!

-Pastor Dustin

What’s the Difference Between Reacting and Responding— Week 2 (3/10/19)

Dear Parents of Teenagers,

It’s time again for our online parenting class. I hope you are enjoying the bite-sized parenting encouragement.

You might be wondering if you can invite other parents to join our online parenting class and the answer is “YES”! You can just reply to this email with their email address and we will get them enrolled in the class.

This month we are talking about how to RESPOND to your teenager instead of REACTING to your teenager.

If you missed last week’s online class, you can go here to find it online: http://awakeningyouthministries.com/blog/what-is-the-difference-between-reacting-and-responding-week-1-3-3-19/.

Did you do your homework from last week? Have you looked up Proverbs 15:1?

This great truth is the first thought that you can bring to your minds and hearts when your teenager opens the door of frustration in your relationship.

But for this lesson I am going to suggest to you three quick thoughts that you can go through like a checklist in your head to keep you from losing your temper:

1) Pray this short prayer first: “God give me grace in the moment”. It is impossible to maintain control of your emotion apart from the grace of God, so be willing to ask for it.

2) Ask yourself, “What can I teach them right now?” This thought will keep you focused on the greater parenting task which is teaching them the beliefs and life skills they need to become an adult.

3) Consider the context. What physical changes could be causing this behavior? What relational pressures or circumstances might be fueling your teenager’s emotional response?

Here is a 6 minute and 29 second video from a recent Parent Seminar that talks more about understanding the Physical Changes that are going on inside of your teenager. Understanding these changes can give you the context you need to RESPOND instead of REACT to their wild mood swings. The video quality isn’t the greatest, but the content is OUTSTANDING! Follow this link to watch the video: http://vimeo.com/parentministry/review/48888063/ff98940e88

Thanks again for being a part of this online parenting class.

My goal is to encourage you, and open the lines of communication between our church and your home. With that in mind, feel free to email me any questions or prayer requests you may have.

Be Blessed!

-Pastor Dustin

  • ~IMPORTANT~

    $100 deposit and applications for our 2020 Kentucky Adventure Camp are due on Sunday, October 27th or Wednesday, October 30th.
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